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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the president and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world, but let me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and looking forward to continuing to work with you in the issues you've championed over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of nuclear biological, chemical weapons, fighting for human rights and against hiv-aids around the world, fighting crime, corruption, drug trafficking and standing up, as you always have, for the interest of the foreign service around the world. in your role, should you will be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded, you will represent the interests of all of us, from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel to promoting commerce, enhancing cross-cultural ties and keeping america secure through cooperation, where possible, and i
boot on foreign-policy. bradley shear worker rights in the workplace. >> as secretary i have no greater priority responsibility. as i have said many times, i take responsibility. nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to be the state department -- to leave the state department safer and more secure. it meant moving quickly to respond to the immediate crisis, but also to further protect our people in high threat areas across the region and the world. host: we will get your reaction this morning to hillary clinton's testimony yesterday. we do expect misses clinton on capitol hill again today as john kerry has his hearing to replace her. for the first 45 minutes, we will get your reaction to the testimony. what's being written and on television. this is your chance to weigh in on what happened yesterday. democ here is the front page of "the washington times." the headline says "tears and rage on benghazi." we begin with an exchange between the secretary and senator ron johnson. [video clip]journal > >> do you agree that a simple phone call -- that was a piece of in
on the notion he was going to transform the way the u.s. conducted its foreign policy around the world. he then proceeded to double down on some of the greatest successes of the bush administration. if you look at the use of the state secrets privilege or the with the obama administration expanded the drone wars, powered special operations forces from jsoc to join special operations command to operate in countries where the united states is not at war, if you look at the way the obama administration essentially boxed congress out of any effective oversight role of the covert aspect of u.s. foreign policy, what we really have is a president who has normalized for many, net -- many liberals, the policies they once opposed under the bush and ministration. this has been a war presidency. yesterday as president obama talked about how we don't need a state of perpetual war, multiple u.s. drone strikes in yemen, a country we are not at war with, where the u.s. has killed a tremendous number of civilians. to make, most disturbing about this is john brennan, who really was the architect of this dro
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
.s. foreign policy? we get some answers. >> brown: then, two military stories. we get the latest on defense secretary leon panetta's decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat. >> ifill: and we explore the pros and cons of drone warfare and examine the technology behind it-- the subject of tonight's edition of "nova." >> our mind tries to put it in rms of robot or human? but the reality is a mix. >> brown: we close with politics and a look at the way forward for the republican party, beginning with today's house vote to extend the nation's debt limit for three months. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: secretary of state hillary clinton testified for the first time today about last september's deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. her testimony befor
too difficult, and they become foreign policy presidents in part because they have so much more leeway. but for barack obama, i think this happened early. >> today, we got the obama plan for leaving iraq... >> president obama announced the current phase of the war is coming to an end... >> narrator: early on, obama had set a timetable for withdrawing troops from iraq. >> within 19 months... >> he came into office promising to get out of iraq. his rise had a lot to do with his opposition to the iraq war. and i don't think he ever looked back. >> narrator: but there was another, secret side to obama's approach to the world. candidate obama had been critical of much of the bush administration's top secret war on terror. as president, it was a different story. >> his people made it clear that in the terrorism arena, he was going to be as tough if not tougher than the bush people. he was going to be extraordinarily aggressive. he and his people reviewed all existing ongoing cia covert operations and with the exception of aggressive interrogations, endorsed all of them, and doubled down on a
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
in africa, and the challenges for u.s foreign policy. the attack on the u.s. consulate we're joined by former u.s. diplomat nicholas burns who served in republican and democratic administrations, he's now with the kennedy school of government and harvard university. and danielle pletka, vice president for foreign and defense studies at the american enterprise institute. with you and start with benghazi. was there more light shed today. where do things stand in terms of understanding what happened and the response to it? >> well, jeffrey, i thought it was a commanding performance by secretary clinton. she was well informed. she was a master of the detail, and all the-- and she took responsibility, which was the right thing to do. she said that she will implement all the 29 recommendations of the accountability review board. now, i think the republicans there obviously had a right-- and i think they had an obligation to ask tough questions because this was a disaster for the american foreign service to lose four people in one day, including ambassador chris stevens. but i must say jus
controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy, but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie, more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry, assuming what most people believe the obvious confirmation because he's of the senate himself, will he be a different secretary of state? >> would expect, charlie, that you'll see a little bit more of the back-channel negotiating style that we associate with a kissinger or jim bake frer senator kerry. he thinks that we need a period of quiet can diplomacy to explore options, to see if there's some way to negotiate some kind of deal over the nuclear issue with iran, to explore some way with russia to get a negotiated political transition in syria. and i think h
. then he becomes a lame duck and then you have to start shifting more and more toward foreign policy, traveling around the world. on the domestic agend ahe has a very short time before he becomes a lame duck. >> the president's inaugural address tomorrow is a tradition that dates back to george washington in 1789. the president plans to look ahead more than back in the speech. let's get some insight from the wall street journal columnist. what are your thoughts on what the president needs to say in order to be most effective, to best set himself up, going into the next four years? >> reporter: well, i don't know. we will find out what he and his aides have decided about that, just about 24 hours from now. i think a second inaugural address is always a little bit difficult, you know? a first inaugural, everybody's new and excited and it's like superman coming out of the telephone booth and showing you the big "s" on his chest. a second inaugural is like, hi, it's me again. so you want to -- you want to try to make it fresh and new anyway. and i think this president has a real opportun
of qaddafi was one of the great successes of their foreign policy. this was the origin of the phrase, leading from behind in the overthrow of qaddafi, yet obviously you have to judge a policy by its aftermath as well as people have criticized the bush administration for what happened in iraq after the overthrow of saddam hussein. libya was not just another embassy. it was not iceland. it wasn't france. it was a very dangerous place, and the fact that the administration would tout libya as a success, even as our ambassador in libya was describing the descent into kay yos that the -- chaos the country was seeing. the growth of terrorist cells and training camps, nothing was being done to affect security but nothing was being done to recognize the failure and the risk to american interests more broadly being reflected by the chaos growing in libya. jon: the administration asserted that the deaths of our ambassador and others resulted from this protest over the online video. the secretary was asked about that today and she got pretty angry, said what does it matter why this thing started. your th
fiscal cliff discussion, the economy is going to get zooming, we're going to -- foreign policy. >> it could end up being in foreign policy, drawing down troops, transitioning to this new kind of fighting force with the drone warfare, sort of in keeping with what we're alluding to eisenhower had. >> i think we're going to watch too very different but equally fascinating dramas play out. inside washington, the republicans still have the votes to stop the president on many things. they still control the house. they still have operational gridlock in the senate, if you will, even though democrats picked up. inside washington, the president has a challenge. but if you look at this, groundbreaking on gaye rights, back to climate change, gun control, immigration. and who that appeals to, as jack just said. they have made a doubling down of what they did in the campaign. they believe they have the coalition of the future -- young people, latinos, african-americans, and they believe the republican coalition is aging, in decline, and fractured. so they think politically they have the jui
is the sole witness today at back-to-back hearings before the senate and house foreign policy committee. here live coverage of the senate hearing at 9:00 a.m. eastern and a house hearing at 2:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span radio or watched the hearings on c-span 3. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> i said it before and i will say it again -- the best training you can get to become a really good police officer and understand what it's all about is walk but -- you learn how to develop sources, you learn how to use intelligence information. you learn how to leverage relationships. that is the key. people in a community trust you, they will tell you when the things that are happening that are not yet -- so you can intervene. they tell you all about how to go about doing it. i really learned the most in my career from those relationships. >> from high school dropout and single mother to the youngest police chief in washington, d.c., history. what cathy lanier on c-span's q&a. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)